Has online admission for RTE quota seats affected the number of applicants?

A comparative glance at the figures reveal that online admission seems to have increased the number of applicants for the RTE quota seats.Last years figures were dismal:

  • 336 out of the 554 schools in the list of education department failed to fill up even a single seat under the 25 per cent quota
  • Only 3,308 students were admitted under the RTE quota (25 per cent) against the 12,818 seats available in 554 schools (including unaided minority schools)

This year, 6,560 students applied online for 8,243 seats in city schools as on Monday, the last day of the admission.

Read the story here.

HIV treatment program completes ten years

Free ART treatment program for people living with HIV/AIDS began in 2004 with eight Centers in six high prevalence states. From eight to 1251 Centers across India, covering 7, 68, 000 people, the program have definitely made an attempt to make treatment available to all. Yet, a significant number, 1.7 million, still require access to treatment. Additionally, recurrent shortage of drugs have continued to remain a cause of  concern. Read the full story, here.

Second-line ART shortage in Mumbai

ART shortages in Mumbai and the rest of the country have caused serious distress to People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIVS) particularly those relying on the free drug supply provided by government hospitals. Read the full report here

According to a DNA Report (to read the full article, click here) 'The country has nearly 2.5 million Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHAs) and the total budget for providing them with the symptom-suppressing anti-retroviral therapy is Rs 4.5 lakh.'

How can we overcome this situation? Share your views.

BMC's budget 2014-15 : Rs 2,660 crore for Education

From 2,115 crore in the previous year to 2,660 crore this year, the BMC budgetary allocations have witnessed a considerable boost. Read the full story here

Will it be a step forward to address the multiple  concerns over the implementation of the provisions under the Right to Education Act (RTE)? Share your opinion.

Glimpses from the Lives of Tribal People in Borivali National Park

From the lives of the tribal inhabitants of SGNP emerges these distressful findings:

i)    Tribal people of SGNP reported rampant substance abuse in the community. Psychological and economical stress came across as the major reasons for substance abuse. 
ii)    Not just adults, most children of the community seem to be addicted to substances like alcohol and tobacco, and that too from an age as early as 15-16 years! 
iii)    With 61% of population in the productive age group of 14-59 years entangled amidst poverty, lack of education and unemployment, substance abuse is an added poison leading to reduced productivity, absence from work and hopelessness! 
iv)    To top it all, addiction encourages borrowing, trapping people in a vicious cycle of debt and poverty! 

SGNP Snippet Post 4 (1).PNG

A vicious cycle to be in for the tribal population of SGNP

Glimpses from the Lives of Tribal People in Borivali National Park

How do the tribal people in SGNP earn their livelihoods?

The lives of tribal people in SGNP is underlined by the complete lack of gainful livelihood opportunities.

The lives of tribal people in SGNP is underlined by the complete lack of gainful livelihood opportunities.

The economic conditions of the tribal people of SGNP are quite bleak. More than half of the population has a monthly income between Rs.1000 to Rs.2000, i.e., around Rs. 35 to Rs. 60 per day. Imagine running a family in today’s time, ensuring education to children and health care to all with this kind of income!

The following hurdles add to their woes:

Denial of customary rights: No access to forest produces unlike in the past! Why? Because the area has been declared a National Park! No cultivable land! 

Seasonality: Constant rains, overflowing rivulets and lack of proper transport severely restrict their movement during monsoons, making it difficult to look for work outside and earn a livelihood!

Temporariness: Deliberate contractual employment of some people by the Forest Department is done to avoid permanent employment status!

Lack of employable skills: Few options of gainful employment outside the Park exist due to limited education and lack of skills!

Glimpses from the Lives of Tribal People in Borivali National Park

 

In the previous post we had shared with you three stark and distressing reality with regard to the condition of education among the tribal children of Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP), Borivali.

What did the ‘Situation Analysis of Tribal People in Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP)' discover with regard to their health situation: 

Without access to basic health facilities, the tribal people of SGNP cover several km through the forest to reach a hospital, sometimes carrying the ailing in a cloth-jholi. 

Without access to basic health facilities, the tribal people of SGNP cover several km through the forest to reach a hospital, sometimes carrying the ailing in a cloth-jholi. 

  • The nearest government hospital is about 6 km from the interior padas. The distance and lack of transport is a constant hurdle. Imagine the severity in case of emergencies! A cloth jholi is often used as a makeshift stretcher to carry patients to the hospitals!

 

  • As if distance to government hospitals was not hurdle enough, the staff there is reportedly uncooperative and rude. Why would anyone not feel left out or neglected in such a situation?

Watch this space for more such information. 

Glimpses from the Lives of Tribal People in Borivali National Park

Most of us visit Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP) for picnics and safaris. Little do we know that Mumbai’s (and Thane) only green patch has a large tribal population living inside it! An even lesser known fact is the kind of dismal condition these tribal people and children live in. So, when Plan India commissioned CCDT to study the situation of the tribal people inside SGNP, especially in the context of Health, Education and Livelihoods, it was an opportunity for TRAC to explore the realities of an underserved community made almost invisible.  

The study, ‘Situation Analysis of Tribal People in Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP)', focused on analyzing the impact of the above-mentioned issues on Survival, Development, and Protection of children. 

SGNP PIC JPEG.png

Some of the most disheartening realities deserve to be highlighted:

  1. About 35% of the population in SGNP is in age group of 6-18. There is no school- government or private- inside the National Park. Children have to walk an average of 5 kilometers from the padas (hamlets) located in the exterior (2-3 kilometers from the highway) and almost 12 kilometers from the interior padas to reach either a government or private school. 
  2. Imagine walking through a difficult forest terrain at least twice every day – be it scorching summer or torrential monsoon!
  3. We often read about children being mauled by leopards, bitten by snakes in this area. And yet, there are hundreds of them who tread this path every day because they want to learn!

Watch this space for more such information. 

बाल-मज़दूरी क्या है? बचपन की हत्या है |

CCDT launches Campaign against Child Labour

 

There are more than two crore child labours in India. Mumbai alone has more than two lakh child labourers.

Child labour, which results from a host of avoidable causes, denies children their rights and a life of dignity. It amounts to a murder of childhoods!

A death of childhoods is the death of hope for a society and a nation.

Today, 5 August, 2013, CCDT launches a Campaign against Child Labour which will culminate on 15 August, 2013. The Campaign gets formally launched outside Dahisar railway station.

As we embark on the countdown to the celebration of another year of Indian Independence, let us join our hands in demanding an end to this nefarious violence against children; let us demand Freedom from Child Labour.

For more details of the Campaign and how you could be a part of it, contact Rashmi: 09920228163 or Smita: 09920047518.

 

23 Nobody’s children die after taking Mid-day Meal

 No, my children

Candles won’t be lit 
None will come out 
Of their homes
Offices and shops
To mourn your death
Let alone protest – 
Why you were 
Poisoned by the ones 
Who had promised to take
Away your hunger

You were not their children
You were no body’s children
Your parents were nobody, my children